Gigs

further-info2

 

Future Work:

1647: The Poorest Hee

We want Bread, and Freedom too!

After five years of war, the troops of the Parliamentary Army held their leaders to account.  “What is the point of fighting the King’s Tyranny, if we just end up with another set of Great Men over us?”  They wanted the vote and they wanted land.  Did they get either?  Come and see….

I think that the poorest Hee that is in England hath a life to live, as the greatest Hee; and therefore truly, Sir, I think itt clear, that every Man that is to live under a Government ought first by his own Consent to put himself under that Government…”       

Thomas Rainsborough, at the Putney Debates, 1647

Leave the dances and the masquerades, the swish of silk and the piles of sweetmeats.  Come with me to Marston Moor, where the Dead tell tales.  Take his thigh-bone: he won’t need it – fashion a flute.  I will teach you a very old tune – the beautiful song of freedom.

The Poorest Hee tells of a struggle for freedom of religion, freedom of the Press, and for the vote.  It swoops from the cropping of William Prynne’s ears to the death of Freeborn John, taking in the Levellers, musket practice, the Putney debates, the illegal newspaper-women of St Paul’s and a little-known connection with Peru.

You can book tickets in advance via Eventbrite (follow the link below).  Soup will be served! – so you can come straight from work if need be and still quiet those rumbling tummies.

To get to the Woodfield Pavilion, there is a little path next to house 16, Abbotswood Road.

 

Practical Details :

Show:                 The Poorest Hee

Date:                   Fri 17th May

Time:                   Doors 6:45pm, show starts at 7:30pm

Place:                  Woodfield Pavilion, Tooting Common

Address:              16a  Abbotswood Road,  SW16  1AP

Hosted by:           South London Storytelling

Tickets:                £12 plus £1.70 booking fee

Event website:     https://www.thewoodfield.org/classes-1/storytelling-evening-with-sarah-rundle-and-south-london-storytelling